They played at the top variety theatre in the south
OBH gallery: stars

 

 

         
Here are the names of the 100 stars in the Big Hippodrome Stars Quiz as part of the exhibition at the Unitarian Chapel, New Road on Monday 30 and Tuesday 31 May. We have compiled a 'recognition factor' based on the number of correct entries in the competition. The RF scores are out of 10. Only three faces were not identified by anyone: numbers 17, 37 and 93. On the other hand, everyone orrectly spotted 5, 8, 9, 31, 38, 40, 42, 45, 52, 57, 60, 67 and 75.
1
1: The High Numbers | 1964 | RF: 0.8 or 8.5 (as The Who)
Became The Who weeks later.
2
2: The Kinks | 1964‘ RF: 7.7
3
3: Chuck Berry | 1964 | RF: 9.2
Headed the very last show 22 November 1964.
4
4: The Animals | 1964 | RF: 7.7
5
5: Dora Bryan | 1964 | RF: 10
Long-time resident in Marine Parade who starred in Here's Dora in the theatre's last summer.
6
6: Dusty Springfield | 1964 | RF: 9.2
7
7: Rolling Stones | 1964 | RF: 9.2
8
8: Dave Clark Five | 1964 | RF: 10
9
9: The Beatles | 1963-64 | RF: 10
The Fab Four, three visits to the Hippodrome. A phenomenon like no other.
10
10: Billy J Kramer | 1963-64 | RF: 6.2
11
11: Gerry & The Pacemakers | 1963-64 | RF 8.5
12
12: Roy Orbison | 1963 RF 9.2
Dislodged at the top of the bill by The Beatles.
13
13: Johnny Kidd & The Pirates | 1963 | RF 6.2
Shakin' All Over and I'll Never Get Over You.
14
14: Cliff Richard | 1963 | RF: 9.2
15
15: Frank Ifield | 1963 | RF 6.9
I'll remember you. And some did.
16
16: Little Eva | 1963 | RF 3.1
Her bit hit was The Loco-Motion in 1962
17
17: Brian Hyland | 1963 | RF 0
First known for something about an itsy-bitsy bikini, then two big UK hits in 1962.
18
18: Sammy Davis Jr | 1963 | RF 8.5
The only one of the Rat Pack to come to the Hippodrome.
19
19: The Shadows | 1962-63 RF: 7.7
Topped the bill in their own right as well as with Cliff.
20
20: The Vernons Girls | 1962-63 | RF 2.3
Oh Boy! Used to work for Vernons Pools. The biggest Liverpool band before the Beatles.
21
21: Little Richard | 1962 | RF 9.2
Tutti frutti, aw rooty. A-wop-boppa-loo-bop..
22
22: Helen Shapiro | 1962 | RF 9.2
Topped the bill aged 15, a year after her first hit.
23
23: Norman Vaughan | 1962 | RF 5.4
Replaced Brucie on Sunday Night at the London Palladium. 'Swinging.' 'Dodgy.' Devised Bullseye.
24
24: Mark Wynter | 1961-64 | RF 4.6
Still treading the boards. Coming soon to the Theatre Royal.
25
25: Joe Brown | 1961-64 | RF 9.2
Session musician who became a Larry Parnes protégé but uniquely kept his real name.
26
26: Sibyl Thorndike | 1961 | RF 3.1
Starred in a two-week run of Vanity Fair.
27
27: Temperance Seven | 1961-62 | RF 3.8
Topped the bill both times in November.
28
28: Russ Conway | 1960-64 | RF 7.7
Emerged from The Billy Cotton Band Show.
29
29: Vince Eager | 1961 RF 0.8
Like Joe Brown, a Larry Parnes protégé.
30
30: Lonnie Donegan | 1960-61 | 9.2
Putting on the Donegan.
31
31: Adam Faith | 1960-62 | RF 10
32
32: Emile Ford | 1960-61 | RF 3.1
and the Checkmates. Died in April 2016.
33
33: Georgie Fame | 1960-61 | RF 4.6
Another (reluctant) Larry Parnes protégé but survived for much greater things.
34
34: Gene Vincent | 1960 | RF 6.2
Injured during the tour in the car crash a month earlier that killed Eddie Cochran.
35
35: Larry Grayson | 1960 | RF 9.2
Shut that door!
36
36: Anthony Newley | 1960 | RF 3.8
When he was replaced by Max Bygraves for the Hippodrome summer season, Bernard Delfont gave him the money to write a musical. Stop the World—I Want to Get Off.
37
37: John Barry Seven | 1960 | RF 0
A tough one! Best known for film scores and Hit and Miss. Backed Adam Faith.
38
38: Bruce Forsyth | 1959 | RF 10
'Nice to see you . . ' The catchphrase king.
39
39: Terry Scott | 1958 | RF 9.2
40
40: Ken Dodd | 1957 | RF 10
How tickled we've been.
41
41: Petula Clark | 1957 | RF 6.9
42
42: Roy Castle | 1956-60 | RF 10
43
43: Tommy Steele | 1956-57 | RF 9.2
44
44: Ruby Murray | 1956 | RF 3.8
45
45: Norman Wisdom | 1955 | RF 10
46
46: Tony Hancock | 1954-62 | RF 8.5
47
47: Frankie Vaughan | 1954-60 | RF 9.2
48
48: Billy Eckstine | 1954-55 | RF 3.8
49
49: Dickie Valentine | 1954 | RF 6.9
50
50: Jimmy Edwards | 1954 | RF 9.2
51
51: Eddie Calvert | 1954 | RF 3.8
The Man with the golden trumpet
52
52: Tommy Cooper | 1952-60 | RF 100
53
53: Harry Worth | 1952-58 | RF 6.9
54
54: Shirley Bassey | 1952-58 | RF 8.5
55
55: Laurel & Hardy | 1952-54 | RF 9.2
56
56: Winifred Atwell | 1951-64 | RF 8.5
Played the organ as well as 'her other piano'.
57
57: Max Bygraves | 1951-61 | RF 10
58
58: Arthur English | 1951-54 | RF 5.4
59
59: Alfred Marks | 1950-61 | RF 9.2
60
60: Terry-Thomas | 1949-55 | RF 60
61
61: Arthur Worsley | 1945-63 | RF 3.8
The dummy was called Charlie Brown.
62
62: Evelyn Laye | 1939-55 | RF 3.1
First topped the bill with Flanagan & Allen.
63
63: Donald Peers | 1945-53 | RF 4.6
Like Emile Ford, had a hit with On a Slow Boat to China.
64
64: Will Hay | 1930-45 | RF 5.4
Best known on stage for his schoolmaster persona.
65
65: Morton Fraser Harmonica Gang | 1944-58 | RF 0.8
Early regulars on television.
66
66: Leslie Hutchinson (Hutch) | 1944-46 | RF 3.8
A major cabaret star, with a reputation for his affairs.
67
67: Arthur Askey | 1944-45 | RF 10
'Hello, playmates!'
68
68: G H Elliott | 1942-58 | RF 3.1
The 'original chocolate coloured coon'. Retired to Rottingdean and is buried in the churchyard there.
69
69: Nat Jackley | 1942-57 | RF 0.8
Poor recognition, despite being on The Beatles' Magical Mystery Tour bus.
70
70: Henry Hall | 1942-54 | RF 3.1
Henry Hall's Guest Night was broadcast live from the Hippodrome in 1942, 1943 and 1947. He died in Eastbourne.
71
71: Jimmy Jewel & Ben Warriss | 1942-54 | RF 5.4
Cousins from Sheffield, together from 1934, becoming the highest paid double act by the 1950s.
72
72: Peter Brough (and Archie Andrews) | 1942-51 | RF 8.5
The best ventriloquist on the radio, whose show gave early opportunities for Tony Hancock and Max Bygraves.
73
73" Tessie O'Shea | 1951-59 | RF 5.8
'Two ton' Tessie.
74
74: Wilson, Keppel & Betty | 1933-58 | 6.2
Billed as 'Cleopatra's nightmare'.
75
75: Max Miller | 1930-55 | RF 100
Brighton's own, at his regular theatre.
76
76: Jack Warner | 1941-44 | RF 5.4
Famous in wartime for his 'blue pencil' letters from his brother but TV made him Dixon of Dock Green.
77
77: Cyril Fletcher | 1941-46 | RF 6.2
Purveyor of odd odes, still being produced on Esther Rantzen's That's Life.
78
78: Bud Flanagan & Chesney Allen | 1937-41 | RF 8.5
In childhood Allen lived in Park Crescent Place, Brighton.
79
79: Elsie & Doris Waters | 1936-54 | RF 6.2
Jack Warner's sisters, famous for their cross-talk act as Gert and Daisy.
80
80: Monsewer Eddie Gray | 1936-54 | RF 3.8
81
81: Western Brothers | 1936-49 | RF 3.1
Topical songs delivered in an upper-class drawl (We're Frightfully BBC). Not brothers but second cousins.
82
82: The Two Leslies | 1936-47 | RF 1.5
Leslie Sarony (famous for Jollity Farm) and Leslie Holmes (who lived and died in Brittany Road, Hove).
83
83: Sandy Powell | 1936-44 | RF 3.1
'Can you hear me, mother?' The poor dummy seems to have had no name.
84
84: Tommy Trinder | 1936-41 | RF 7.7
'You lucky people!'
85
85: Alicia Markova | 1936 | RF 5.4
Danced Carnaval with the Markova-Dolin Company.
86
86: Larry Adler | 1936 | RF 6.9
One of the great mouth organists, with a repertoire from classical to Genevieve.
87
87: George Formby (Jr) | 1935-58 | 9.2
Son of another music hall artiste, George epitomised northern humour with his banjolele.
88
88: Arthur Lucan | 1933-46 | RF 6.2
Better known as Old Mother Riley, with his wife Kitty McShane as daughter Kitty.
89
89: Ernie Lotinga | 1932-46 | RF 0.8
More forgotten than most stars of his era, starred as 'Josser' in 1930s films.
90
90: Layton & Johnstone | 1932-34 | RF 2.3
Sold vast numbers of records (American duettists with piano). Broke up in 1935 as a result of divorce scandal involving Clarence 'Tandy' Johnstone. Turner Layton continued solo.
91
91: George Robey | 1906-47 | RF 5.4
Retired to New Church Road, Hove and then Arundel Drive East, Saltdean. Knighted shortly before his death in 1953.
92
92: Gracie Fields | 1931-38 | RF 4.6
The lassie from Lancashire.
93
93: Nellie Melba | 1929 | RF 0
Dame Nellie gave a charity concert for Sussex Eye Hospital.
94
94: Paul Whiteman | 1926 | RF 2.3
The most successful bandleader in the world at the time. Bing Crosby joined him later in the year.
95
95: Laurence Olivier | 1925-58 | RF 8.5
Made his debut at the Hippodrome, returned years later as The Entertainer.
96
96: Tiller Girls | 1911-60 | RF 8.5
John Tiller started his dance troup nearly 50 years before Sunday Night at the London Palladium.
97
97: Max Wall | 1927-57 | RF 8.5
98
98: Charlie Chaplin | 1907 | RF 9.2
Came with Fred Karno's troupe.
99
99: Hetty King | 1905-58 | RF 3.8
Did this male impersonator have the longest Hippodrome career of all: 53 years?
100
100: Harry Houdini | 1904 | RF 9.2

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Page updated 29 May 2016